Preparing for Worship

haney-doug_138x195.jpgThis spring, Jeff Hampton and I led a hymn-writing seminar. About a dozen Wilshire members met weekly to learn how to create texts for worship. Several writers composed original hymns for the class to sing and enjoy and discuss.

One of the hymns that came out of this laboratory is this Sunday morning’s first hymn. “We Adore You, God, Creator” is a new text by James Steel, a member of Sanctuary Choir and our new handbell coordinator. It is set to the hymn tune NETTLETON; we often sing “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” to this familiar melody.

This new hymn is a song of praise and adoration to God. It is built around three names of God based on God’s generous activity on our behalf: God, the Creator; God, the Provider; and God, the Sustainer. While it does not quote Scripture directly, this hymn points to Scripture in each stanza.

In the beginning God created (Genesis 1:1). Creating the world is God’s first act of love. We praise God who has created all that we see and hear and taste and continues the work of creation in and through us. And this creation is “still unfolding.” Wonder, praise and adoration is our fitting response. Humanity made in God’s image cannot help but join in the glorious work of creation: hymns, music, art, gardens, pastries, quilts, computers, airplanes, skyscrapers. So how do we express praise to this Creator God? The heart’s intention, the voice’s expression, the mind’s attention combine to bring our entire being to God.  

The Lord is my Shepherd (Psalm 23:1). My sheep hear my voice (John 10:27). The Old Testament and New Testament paint a picture of God as shepherd, the one who cares for, protects and guides the sheep. This is easy to affirm when life is good and when it seems the world makes sense. But what happens when we are disoriented or disappointed?  What happens when life is too hard for words? We may not feel there is a shepherd very near. We may have little sense of being sheltered from life’s tragedies. It is no wonder that “faith wavers and we question.” 

When we gather in worship, some will sing songs of God’s goodness and providence with confidence, and others only haltingly, wondering if God will provide a way forward. Maybe part of the reason to come to this sacred space each week is to listen to the songs of faith and to lean on each other’s faith by singing.

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you (Isaiah 43:2). The Hebrew people of ancient times feared water. They were not a seafaring people. The story of Jonah and the whale was a terrifying tale. No reasonable person could expect to be thrown off a boat into the raging water and survive. What an odd story of survival to include a captivity of three nights in the belly of a great fish with no apparent escape. What sort of God sustains life by taking us deeper and darker and further down than we’ve ever been? And yet God holds onto us even when we are not strong enough to hold onto God. The God whom we adore sustains us and heals us with a tender and fierce love.

This God, our Creator, our Provider, our Sustainer is the One whom we adore today and forevermore. Let us lift our voices together in praise with our sisters and brothers who are gathered to worship God.

July 15 Worship order containing the hymn on page 3 (pdf)

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MOPS: Find your fire

mops-2018-sm.jpeg

Summer is in full swing, and the MOPS steering team and discussion group leaders are working hard to prepare for a new year at Wilshire MOPS.

MOPS, which stands for Mothers of Preschoolers, is a Wilshire ministry that offers stress relief, encouragement and spiritual nourishment to mothers of preschoolers. The group is founded on the belief that remarkable things happen when moms come together. Wilshire’s group of about 80 moms meets from 9 a.m. to noon every other Friday, from September to May. Child care/activities are available for your kids during these meetings.

Whether you are a soon-to-be mom, first-time mom or seventh-time mom, you are welcome here. Whether you are an adoptive mom, young mom, seasoned mom, foster mom, stepmom or any other type of mom, you are welcome here. 

If you are interested in joining the group or learning how you can help this Wilshire ministry, contact Katie Payne or visit wilshirebc.org/learn/mops.

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Tapestry News Briefs

Want to get a copy  of Wilshire’s new pictorial directory? You’ve got to be in the directory to receive a directory. Don’t be left out. Photography dates begin soon.Sign up at wilshirebc.org/registration.

Pack a bag for refugees this Sunday morning, July 15.The Missions Committee and Christian Advocacy Committee invite you to stop by James Gallery today to pack a hygiene kit for refugees being served by Catholic Charities in the Rio Grande Valley. They are seeing 150 to 250 people a day come through their center, people who have been released from immigration detention centers with nothing in their possession. At the respite center they are able to get a change of clothes, a hot meal, a shower, a bag for their travel and hopefully a piece of their dignity restored. Our goal today is not speed of packing but deliberate packing surrounded by prayer for each hygiene kit assembled.

Children’s MusiCamp musical. Everyone is invited to hear this year’s MusiCamp program, Oh, Jonah Sunday night, July 15, at 5:30 p.m. in the Sanctuary. Free. A cast of first through sixth graders have learned the musical, including songs, drama and choreography, this week. 

This Wednesday at Wilshire, July 18. Hear Pastoral Resident Jakob Topper tell about the recent experience he and his wife, Alyssa, had in the birth of their daughter, Hadley. He will speak at noon in James Gallery, with lunch served beginning at 11 a.m. The next week, July 25, hear Cindy Ward tell about how her son was rescued by Wilshire mission partner CitySquare. Lunch is $7 or $5 for the soup and salad option.

Koinonia Café July 18 (in James Gallery): Grilled steak with red peppers and rosemary, biscuit-topped chicken pot pie, green beans, Parmesan potatoes, zucchini with tomatoes, herbed corn, salad bar, dessert bar.

Homebound visitors needed. Research has shown two major issues facing older senior adults in the United States are feelings of isolation and loneliness. To address these issues, Wilshire needs some additional compassionate encouragers who are active listeners to visit members no longer able to attend services or Bible study. This one-on-one ministry gives the visitor the freedom of working within their own schedule. Homebound visitors are asked to make at least one visit and a couple of phone calls each month, in addition to recognizing birthdays. Training is available. To learn more, contact Jessica Capps, minister to senior adults, at (214) 452-3129 .

Want to help children? There’s a way you can shape and serve children every week: By volunteering as a teacher in Sunday School, Globetrekkers, Bible Skills class, or children’s choirs. The start of a new year in late August is the ideal time to get started. Learn more about current needs by talking with Julie Girards, minister to children or Joan Hammons, minister to preschoolers.

Reception for Sarah Stafford. Mark your calendars for a retirement reception for Sarah Stafford on Sunday, July 29, from 4 to 6 p.m. in Community Hall. Sarah is retiring from her full-time ministerial staff position but will remain the part-time director of New Song senior adult choir. If you or a family member has participated in a group Sarah has directed, please bring a photo to share for a display at the reception. All ages are welcome.

Adult ushers needed. Many new members have signed up to serve as ushers, but the ranks are thin this summer due to travel. Additional ushers, particularly adults, are needed. To sign up and start volunteering immediately, contact Abbey Adcox.

A Forum on Race in American Film. For more than 100 years, American films have carried our most powerful stories about race, prejudice and identity, reflecting both our best hopes and our worst fears. On Saturday, Aug. 11, join in a morning of conversation about film, race and faith with Greg Garrett, hailed by BBC Radio as “one of America’s leading voices on religion and culture.” Greg is currently at work on a book on race and film for Oxford University Press, and last February he curated a race and film festival at Washington National Cathedral. He is the author of 20 books (including critically acclaimed works on film, popular culture, religion and politics), an award-winning professor of English at Baylor University, and a licensed lay preacher in the Episcopal Church. The free program begins with breakfast served at 8:30 and will conclude by noon.

School supply bags. Just like the food bags collected at Thanksgiving, we have brown grocery bags around the church with a stapled school supply list on each bag for congregants to pick up and fill and then drop off by Sunday, July 29. The Missions Committee hopes to fill about 120 backpacks for children ages birth to 18 at our Food on the Move site.

Summer library hours. The Wilshire Library will be open this summer on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., except on Wednesdays when the hours will be 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday hours are 8 to 10:45 a.m. Also on Wednesdays now through Aug. 15, Librarian Barbara Peterson will offer a preschool story time beginning at 2 p.m. Wilshire’s excellent lending library is open to the church and our neighbors.

WOW! Tuesday Book Club. This new group will meet on the second Tuesday of each month beginning Aug. 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Wilshire Parlor. For the first meeting, the book is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. The book was made into a hit Broadway play. Contact Tiffany Wright for information.

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A forum on race in American Film

greggarrettbox.jpgFor more than 100 years, American films have carried our most powerful stories about race, prejudice and identity, reflecting both our best hopes and our worst fears. 

On Saturday, Aug. 11, join in a morning of conversation about film, race and faith with Greg Garrett, hailed by BBC Radio as “one of America’s leading voices on religion and culture.” 

Greg is currently at work on a book on race and film for Oxford University Press, and last February he curated a race and film festival at Washington National Cathedral. He is the author of 20 books (including critically acclaimed works on film, popular culture, religion and politics), an award-winning professor of English at Baylor University, and a licensed lay preacher in the Episcopal Church.

The free program begins with breakfast served at 8:30 a.m. and will conclude by noon. Free.

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What Wilshire is doing about the border crisis

A letter from George Mason, senior pastor

Dear friends:

For a couple of weeks now, many of you have been asking our staff how we as a church might minister to refugee families at the Texas-Mexico border, including those parents and children who have been separated from each other. Heather Mustain, our minister of missions and advocacy, has been hard at work on this, and what she has encountered is challenge after challenge. This is a vexing problem with few easy action steps.

I want to explain some of these challenges and then highlight a couple of upcoming opportunities.

A couple of our own members—Jay Pritchard and Cheryl Allison—have been to the border recently as part of an initiative organized by CBF and Fellowship Southwest. What they have confirmed is what you probably have read in news accounts, that the primary and best work being done there is through Catholic Charities. Because of the nature of the government’s actions on the border, most religious and nonprofit entities do not have access to serve adults or children being taken into detention. And the speed with which many refugees are being sent back across the border precludes interfacing with them on the U.S. side.

Calls have gone out for very specialized professionals, such as crisis counselors, child therapists and bilingual immigration attorneys. Thousands of people from across the United States already have responded to these appeals.

We have taken a cautious approach because we do not want to dump unneeded charitable donations on a region with no infrastructure to use those donations. We want to be wise in our help.

Here is what we’ve learned as of today:

The Humanitarian Respite Center at Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley has confirmed that they need hygiene kits. They are seeing 150 to 250 people a day come through their center. These are folks who are released from the detention centers and expected to make it to their “family or sponsor” while their asylum cases are adjudicated. They literally have nothing, and some haven’t even showered in over a month. At the respite center they are able to get a change of clothes, a hot meal, a shower, a bag for their travel and hopefully a piece of their dignity restored.

On Sunday, July 15, we will pack 500 hygiene bags in James Gallery, with leadership from the Missions Committee and Christian Advocacy Committee. Anyone interested in helping will be invited to stop by to package the items that will have been secured in advance, using your gifts to Wilshire’s Unified Budget.

On Sunday, July 22, we hope to present a more detailed report on the work of Fellowship Southwest in addressing the border crisis.

Just today we learned of a local opportunity that might be of interest to a few Wilshire folks. A court monitoring project is being activated by FIRE, which is short for Force for Immigrant Rights and Empowerment, a coalition of organizations and individuals committed to providing services to immigrants and refugees in the Dallas area. Any interested advocate is invited to attend a July 11 training session at 6:30 p.m. at Temple Emanu-El to become a court observer in the immigration courts. The role of these observers is to determine whether asylum seekers and unaccompanied children are being treated fairly and in accordance with due process. Sign up for training by emailing Eva Castilla. The training will be presented by Paul Zoltan, a well-respected immigration lawyer who specializes in asylum work.  Through this training, volunteers will learn about the current facts on the ground in the immigration courts.

We know that Wilshire members want to do so much more than this, and we are hopeful that a time will come soon when there will be more tangible things we can do. Please do not let the fire of your passion for this cause burn out.

In the meantime, we will join together in daily and unceasing prayer for all God’s children who are in distress because they cannot remain in their homelands and yet cannot gain entry to a new life in our country. I invite you to join me in praying not only for these human lives in distress but also for all our elected officials who have the power to create and enforce a better way.

Whatever your political identity, we as Christians surely can join together in hearing the words of Scripture that over and over call us to welcome the stranger, to show kindness to widows and orphans in their distress and to love our neighbors as ourselves. These are fundamental commands of both the Old Testament and New Testament.

We say this repeatedly, but it still is true: If you join me in being concerned about the current state of U.S. immigration policies and practices, keep contacting your elected representatives in Washington. Call, email, write letters, make personal visits. Tell your story. Quote Scripture. Make the case yet again. Speak truth. Use your unique voice. Testify to the human dignity of all people. Call for our country to live out its founding values of liberty and justice for all.

Heather and our Missions and Christian Advocacy committees will continue to provide updates as we learn more.

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Prayer Notes

July 8-13

Congratulations to:

Honeycutt and Salvador Delgado on the birth of their daughter, July 12. Big brothers and sister are:  Andrew, Joshua and Elie Delgado.

Condolences to:

Marshall Meyer on the death of his father, Richard Meyer, who died July 2.  Private family graveside service will be held July 30.

Kristi and David Walters on the death of Kristi’s mother, Thursday, July 5.  Grandsons are: Ethan, Christopher and Sam Walters. Arrangements pending.

Others in need of prayer:

Ginny, Bettye, Ron

*Names in bold indicate Wilshire members.

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Preparing for Worship

harper-sm.jpgBy Harper McKenzie

I’ve been working with preschoolers lately, and I love it so much. There’s just something about seeing their little shining faces when they laugh, sing or smile that makes my world turn.

There’s nothing that compares to the joy I feel when a child writes their name correctly, shares a toy kindly or even goes “potty” successfully. There is nothing that compares to the sadness I feel when a child scrapes a knee, sits scared in the corner or cries out for mommy. When I see those little ones suffering, all I want to do is send every ounce of love, support and courage into their hearts.

If only hugging them or telling them “it will be OK” would actually make it OK. It might make things better in the moment, but I know nothing will make all their suffering disappear. I know we want these kids to have “a good life, not an easy life,” but it still hurts to watch children suffer. 

This is the way I feel about being with children, and I am sure it is a universal experience whether you are a parent, a grandparent, a teacher or a babysitter. We’ve all felt this kind of love for a child—or at least I hope we have—because loving children is a part of what makes us human. Loving a child and wanting them to have the best life is the best display of human love. We put aside our needs, sacrifice our time and fill our hearts with loving thoughts for these kids. 

While this makes us human, it’s also strikingly similar to the way God loves us—unconditionally and deeply.

On the preschool hallway here at Wilshire, the goal is to make children feel loved. Loved by us, but mostly by God. We teach them that God loves children and that Jesus said, “Let the little children come.” We teach them that love is stronger than hate. We teach them to be kind to everyone they meet because everyone is their neighbor and because God loves everyone.

Those are wonderful messages to send to children, but they’re also great messages to send to adults. We, too, are God’s children, and sometimes we forget how much love matters.

So, as you enter worship on Sunday, hear and remember the messages we send to children. God loves you because God loves everyone. 

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Tapestry News Briefs

Generosity updateAs of June 30, gifts to Wilshire’s Unified Budget totaled $1,742,152, which was $294,848 or about 17 percent below projected revenue for the period. By comparison, gifts to the Unified Budget through June 2017 totaled $1,969,137, which was about 4.5 percent below projected revenue for the period. Expenses through June 2018 totaled $1,954,706, creating a year-to-date operating deficit of $212,554. Designated gifts for specific missions and ministries totaled $48,542. The current value of the George A. Mason Pathways to Ministry Endowment stands at $4,657,301, with $43,644 given toward the endowment thus far this year.  

This Wednesday at Wilshire, July 11. After the holiday break, we’re back to a regular summer schedule this Wednesday. Come for lunch in Community Hall beginning at 11 a.m., and then stay for the “This Is My Story” program at noon. This week’s speaker is Woody Weilage. The following week, July 18, the speaker will be Jakob Topper.

Koinonia Café July 11: Beef-stuffed bell peppers, baked tilapia, sautéed kale, roasted potatoes, broccoli gratin, buttered carrots, salad bar, dessert bar.

Adult ushers needed. Many new members have signed up to serve as ushers, but the ranks are thin this summer due to travel. Additional ushers, particularly adults, are needed. To sign up and start volunteering immediately, contact Abbey Adcox at (214) 452-3127.

Wilkinson Center shoe drive. Volunteers (age 16 and older) are needed to help with the Wilkinson Center’s annual shoe drive on Sunday, July 29, and Monday, July 30. Sign up at wilshirebc.org/registration.

A Forum on Race in American Film. For more than 100 years, American films have carried our most powerful stories about race, prejudice and identity, reflecting both our best hopes and our worst fears. On Saturday, Aug. 11, join in a morning of conversation about film, race and faith with Greg Garrett, hailed by BBC Radio as “one of America’s leading voices on religion and culture.” Greg is currently at work on a book on race and film for Oxford University Press, and last February he curated a race and film festival at Washington National Cathedral. He is the author of 20 books (including critically acclaimed works on film, popular culture, religion and politics), an award-winning professor of English at Baylor University, and a licensed lay preacher in the Episcopal Church. The free program begins with breakfast served at 8:30 and will conclude by noon.

Children’s MusiCamp musical. Everyone is invited to hear this year’s MusiCamp program, “Oh, Jonah!” on Sunday evening, July 15, at 5:30 p.m. in the Sanctuary. A cast of children will learn the musical, including songs, drama and choreography, this week.

School supply bags. Just like at Thanksgiving, we are going to have brown grocery bags around the church with a stapled school supply list on each bag for congregants to pick up and fill and then drop off by Sunday, July 29. The Missions Committee hopes to fill about 120 backpacks for children ages birth to 18 at our Food on the Move site.

Reception for Sarah Stafford. Mark your calendars for a retirement reception for Sarah Stafford on Sunday, July 29, from 4 to 6 p.m. in Community Hall. Sarah is retiring from her full-time ministerial staff position but will remain the part-time director of New Song senior adult choir. If you or a family member has participated in a group Sarah has directed, please bring a photo to share for a display at the reception. All ages are welcome.

“The Enneagram and Relationships”. Suzanne Stabile, co-author of The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery and author of The Path Between Us: An Enneagram Journey to Healthy Relationships, will lead a one-day workshop at Wilshire on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her teaching will include the uniqueness of each personality, the ways one Enneagram number relates to another, and what each personality would want others to know. Suzanne is a nationally recognized teacher on this ancient way of understanding personality. Register at www.lifeinthetrinityministry.com.

Feed the homeless. Volunteers are needed to serve lunch at The Bridge Homeless Recovery Center in downtown Dallas with a group from Wilshire the first Thursday of every month. You are not required to volunteer every month, but if you are interested in adding your name to the pool, contact Missions Committee member and liaison Ken Adams.

Summer library hours. The Wilshire Library will be open this summer on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., except on Wednesdays when the hours will be 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday hours are 8 to 10:45 a.m. Also on Wednesdays now through Aug. 15, Librarian Barbara Peterson will offer a preschool story time beginning at 2 p.m. Wilshire’s excellent lending library is open to the church and our neighbors.

WOW! Tuesday Book Club. This new group will meet on the second Tuesday of each month beginning Aug. 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Wilshire Parlor. For the first meeting, the book is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. The book was made into a hit Broadway play. Contact Tiffany Wright for information.

Looking ahead to fall

August
19: Promotion Sunday
19: Blessing of Backpacks
19: Youth Choir/Shekinah/Paradiso begin
19: Kindergarten worship education   
22: Watershed kickoff  (youth)
22: Wednesday dinner resumes
22: Resident-led vespers
27: Wilshire Winds resumes
29: Sanctuary Choir resumes
29: Music & Missions/Bible Skills begin

September
5: NewSong Senior Adult Community Choir resumes
11: Jazz Stand on Abrams resumes
16: Ordination service for Associate Minister of Music & Organist Jeff Brummel
23: Tony Campolo guest preacher in worship
23: Wilshire Talks                                                         

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Preparing for Worship

jeffbrummel.jpgHave you ever had one of those moments where it seemed that the veil between heaven and earth was so thin that you felt as if you could see the very face of God? Just over a week ago, I had that moment with the Wilshire Youth Choir on our mission tour to Oregon.

One day on the tour, we were guests at the Mount Angel Abbey, nestled in the heart of the Willamette Valley, where we sang a concert in the beautiful abbey church. Before our concert, Brother Cyril, a resident Benedictine monk, took the Youth Choir on a tour of the abbey grounds. The culmination of our tour ended with a stunning view from atop a bluff overlooking fertile farm lands set against the framework of the green-timbered Cascade Mountains with the massive snow-covered picturesque Mount Hood as its focal point. As we stood for a minute or two in absolute silence overlooking the “purple mountain majesties above the fruited plain,” I found myself holding back tears. How can this place be? How is it that I get to enjoy this moment and with such incredible youth? How will this moment impact the lives of Wilshire’s youth? What memories from the rest of our trip will shape these soon-to-be young adults?

The variety of climate, topography, flora and fauna found throughout the United States and the rest of our planet causes me to stop and reflect. What an outstanding palette of color with which our God paints this lone terrestrial sphere suspended in the blackness of space. God has created our world with such depth, beauty and intentionality—not just in nature, but in our individual lives, personalities and giftedness as well.

As we worship today, note the beauty surrounding you. In the flowers you see, the music you hear and sing, the colonially inspired architecture of the room, the colors of the stops from the organ, the poetry from the pulpit, the ceremony of the Lord’s Supper, the passing of the peace and the diversity of the people here today who surround you in love.

This morning, as we celebrate with the backdrop of beauty, let us come with joy, as children of God, forgiven, loved and free.

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Tapestry News Briefs

Seriously, we want your photograph. You’ve read the announcements, received the email, laughed at the robocall. Now it’s time to take the next step and sign up for the church’s new pictorial directory. Seriously. We want you to be included. There’s no cost to participate, and you’ll get a free 8 x 10 portrait. Plus, everyone who is photographed gets a copy of the new directory. Sign up at from the link at wilshirebc.org/registration. If you need assistance signing up, contact Kathi Lyle at (214) 452-3130.

This Wednesday at Wilshire. Due to the July 4 holiday, there will be no Wednesday activities nor meal at Wilshire this week. The church offices will be closed. Regular summer Wednesday activities will resume the following week, July 11.

Blood drive successful. Thanks to everyone who donated blood at last Sunday’s quarterly blood drive. It was the most successful drive in several years. Carter Bloodcare reported 31 participants who gave 28 pints of blood. These life-saving donations will help as many as 84 patients.

School supply bags. Similar to what we do at Thanksgiving, we are going to have brown grocery bags around the church with a stapled school supply list on each bag for congregants to pick up and fill and then drop off by Sunday, July 29. The Missions Committee hopes to use the collected supplies to fill about 120 backpacks for children ages birth to 18 at our Food on the Move site.

Food on the Move report. This begins week five of Food on the Move, which already has involved 50 volunteers who have distributed 150 Weekend Food Bags that include a new book each week and have hosted a Science Camp. We could still use your help. Sign up at wilshirebc.org/registration.

Wilkinson Center shoe drive. Volunteers (age 16 and older) are needed to help with the Wilkinson Center’s annual shoe drive on Sunday, July 29, and Monday, July 30. Sign up at wilshirebc.org/registration.

Letter-writing success. Thank you to everyone who stopped by James Gallery last Sunday and wrote your elected representatives. We collected and mailed 140 letters. Both the Missions and Advocacy committees are searching for ways to engage meaningfully with the crisis on the border and will publish that information as soon as it is known.

Reception for Sarah Stafford. Mark your calendars for a retirement reception for Sarah Stafford on Sunday, July 29, from 4 to 6 p.m. in Community Hall. Sarah is retiring from her full-time ministerial staff position but will remain the part-time director of New Song senior adult choir. If you or a family member has participated in a group Sarah has directed, please bring a photo to share for a display at the reception. All ages are welcome.

“The Enneagram and Relationships”. Suzanne Stabile, co-author of The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery and author of The Path Between Us: An Enneagram Journey to Healthy Relationships, will lead a one-day workshop at Wilshire on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Her teaching will include the uniqueness of each personality, the ways one Enneagram number relates to another, and what each personality would want others to know. Suzanne is a nationally recognized teacher on this ancient way of understanding personality. Register at www.lifeinthetrinityministry.com.

Feed the homeless. Volunteers are needed to serve lunch at The Bridge Homeless Recovery Center in downtown Dallas with a group from Wilshire the first Thursday of every month. You are not required to volunteer every month, but if you are interested in adding your name to the pool, contact Missions Committee member and liaison Ken Adams.

Summer library hours. The Wilshire Library will be open this summer on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., except on Wednesdays when the hours will be 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday hours are 8 to 10:45 a.m. Also on Wednesdays now through Aug. 15, Librarian Barbara Peterson will offer a preschool story time beginning at 2 p.m. Wilshire’s excellent lending library is open to the church and our neighbors.

WOW! Tuesday Book Club. This new group will meet on the second Tuesday night of each month beginning Aug. 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Wilshire Parlor. For the first meeting, the book is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. The book was made into a hit Broadway play. Contact Tiffany Wright for information.

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